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Historic Travellers Rest Plantation and Museum

Travellers Rest in Nashville was so named by its original owner Judge John Overton (1767-1833) because his home was his haven from the busy world of a circuit judge making long horseback rides throughout the countryside. Today it is on the National Register of Historic Places, and provides visitors with a peek into the Federal period, Civil War days, slavery and politics. Perhaps one of the most interesting things about the property is that while excavating in the cellar of the house, a Native American village from 1400 – 1475 AD was discovered, shedding light on the advanced social, agricultural, and artistic nature of the earliest inhabitants.

Judge Overton expanded the original construction of the house to accommodate the increasing size of the family, and developed the plantation’s farm which covered more than 1000 acres and was worked by approximately 80 slaves. The Museum documents the life and work of the Judge as well as the history of Nashville during the Civil War. Begin with a film in the visitor’s center and proceed through the house to view furniture, paintings, and objet d’art from the family. The story of those who lived in and visited the house come to life through the tour guide’s knowledgeable storytelling.

There are two primary exhibits to explore. The first is about the unfolding of history at Travellers Rest as it became an encampment area for both the Confederate and Union armies at alternating times.

The second exhibit is the story of the enslaved people upon whom the plantation depended for its survival. Letters, ledgers and advertisements paint a picture of these individuals. Housed in the Weaving House, which served as a home for two slaves, you’ll gain a better understanding of life under the yoke of slavery.

Please Note: Children 5 and under are free.

Hours: Monday - Saturday, 10am - 4:30pm (last tour begins at 4pm)
Location: Travellers Rest, 636 Farrell Parkway Nashville, TN 37220

Travellers Rest in Nashville was so named by its original owner Judge John Overton (1767-1833) because his home was his haven from the busy world of a circuit judge making long horseback rides throughout the countryside. Today it is on the National Register of Historic Places, and provides visitors with a peek into the Federal period, Civil War days, slavery and politics. Perhaps one of the most interesting things about the property is that while excavating in the cellar of the house, a Native American village from 1400 – 1475 AD was discovered, shedding light on the advanced social, agricultural, and artistic nature of the earliest inhabitants.

Judge Overton expanded the original construction of the house to accommodate the increasing size of the family, and developed the plantation’s farm which covered more than 1000 acres and was worked by approximately 80 slaves. The Museum documents the life and work of the Judge as well as the history of Nashville during the Civil War. Begin with a film in the visitor’s center and proceed through the house to view furniture, paintings, and objet d’art from the family. The story of those who lived in and visited the house come to life through the tour guide’s knowledgeable storytelling.

There are two primary exhibits to explore. The first is about the unfolding of history at Travellers Rest as it became an encampment area for both the Confederate and Union armies at alternating times.

The second exhibit is the story of the enslaved people upon whom the plantation depended for its survival. Letters, ledgers and advertisements paint a picture of these individuals. Housed in the Weaving House, which served as a home for two slaves, you’ll gain a better understanding of life under the yoke of slavery.

Please Note: Children 5 and under are free.

Hours: Monday - Saturday, 10am - 4:30pm (last tour begins at 4pm)
Location: Travellers Rest, 636 Farrell Parkway Nashville, TN 37220

ADULT:

$12.00

CHILD:

$6.00

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adult:

$12.00

child:

$6.00

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