Philadelphia

Betsy Ross House

In the historic district of Philadelphia you will find the home of Betsy Ross, where the sights and sounds of daily 18th century life come alive. Betsy’s story of being commissioned by George Washington, Robert Morris, and Colonel George Ross to sew the first American flag is tightly woven into the fabric of American history. There is much more to this independent, entrepreneurial, caregiving Free Quaker woman though, and a visit to her home is just the place for discovering more about the trials, joys, family life and political views of this extraordinary upholsterer.

The house itself is recognized as where Betsy lived when she made that first American flag. The style is called a “bandbox,” with one room on each floor and a winding staircase stretching from cellar to upper levels. The first floor front room was an ideal location for the family’s upholstery business, with a large window in front to display merchandise. Visitors to the home today can view seven period rooms, including bedrooms, the parlor, the kitchen, and the only interpretation of an 18th century upholstery shop in the entire country. The rooms are furnished with period antiques as well as several of Betsy’s actual belongings, including her eyeglasses and Chippendale and Sheraton side chairs.

Self-guided tours are available, or you can put on some headphones and take an audio tour to help you identify everything you see. The kid’s audio tour is an exciting and hands-on approach that will keep youngsters engaged as they solve 13 “history mysteries.”

Location: 239 Arch Street, Philadelphia PA 19106
Hours: March - November: Daily, 10 m- 5pm; December-February: Tuesday-Sunday, 10am - 5pm

In the historic district of Philadelphia you will find the home of Betsy Ross, where the sights and sounds of daily 18th century life come alive. Betsy’s story of being commissioned by George Washington, Robert Morris, and Colonel George Ross to sew the first American flag is tightly woven into the fabric of American history. There is much more to this independent, entrepreneurial, caregiving Free Quaker woman though, and a visit to her home is just the place for discovering more about the trials, joys, family life and political views of this extraordinary upholsterer.

The house itself is recognized as where Betsy lived when she made that first American flag. The style is called a “bandbox,” with one room on each floor and a winding staircase stretching from cellar to upper levels. The first floor front room was an ideal location for the family’s upholstery business, with a large window in front to display merchandise. Visitors to the home today can view seven period rooms, including bedrooms, the parlor, the kitchen, and the only interpretation of an 18th century upholstery shop in the entire country. The rooms are furnished with period antiques as well as several of Betsy’s actual belongings, including her eyeglasses and Chippendale and Sheraton side chairs.

Self-guided tours are available, or you can put on some headphones and take an audio tour to help you identify everything you see. The kid’s audio tour is an exciting and hands-on approach that will keep youngsters engaged as they solve 13 “history mysteries.”

Location: 239 Arch Street, Philadelphia PA 19106
Hours: March - November: Daily, 10 m- 5pm; December-February: Tuesday-Sunday, 10am - 5pm

ADULT:

$7.00

CHILD:

$5.00

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adult:

$7.00

child:

$5.00

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